CAN YOGA REPLACE STRENGTH TRAINING?

As a practitioner for 30 years and a true believer in the benefits of yoga, I present the following wonderful article to help YOU get started!

Shar~

Tone up with these poses — no weight training required

:: by

Kelly Turner, ACE certified personal trainer, and Gaiam Staff
 

When you hear the term strength training, you probably think weight training — numerous reps of muscle contractions using weights as resistance. But if you’ve ever had sore muscles after a good yoga class, you’ve probably wondered: Does yoga count as strength training?

Experts advise doing some form of strength training at least twice a week to keep metabolism running efficiently, and many doctors recommend weight training as the No. 1 preventive measure against bone loss.

For many of us, this conjures a vision of becoming an eternal slave to weight machines, dumbbells or resistance cords. So … can you just do some yoga instead?

Can yoga really build muscle?

“People always ask me, ‘Don’t you lift weights?'” says yoga expert Rodney Yee. “I sort of giggle to myself and say, ‘Yes — I lift my own body weight!'”

When you do yoga poses, Yee explains, “You’re putting your body in positions and orientations that you ultimately have to support with your muscles. So you are lifting weights.”

Rodney Yee Cobra Pose

Like many yogis, Yee doesn’t like focusing on how yoga can sculpt your physique. They want students to focus on yoga as a way of thinking, feeling and being, versus getting preoccupied with perfecting their outer appearance.

Still, when you look at Yee’s arms (the photos in this article show him in a few strength-building yoga poses), you can’t help but want some of the yoga poses they’re having for breakfast.

The upshot is that you can increase muscle tone and definition — and even muscle size — with yoga. But because you’re limited to “lifting” your own body weight, it may take a lot more skill, time and determination than it would with lifting weights.

“Yoga can be just as effective as weights when it comes to building a stronger, more impressive physique,” says Nicholas DiNubile, M.D. Yet experts agree that whether yoga can be your sole form of strength training depends on your goals.

Weights are best for building bulk

“If all you’re looking to do is build muscle, weight training is the more practical approach,” advises DiNubile. In fact, the American Council on Exercise defines strength training as “exercising with progressively heavier resistance for the purpose of strengthening the muscular skeletal system.”

Yet the key phrase here is progressively heavier resistance. Basically, your muscles and bones must be overloaded to keep developing. With traditional weight training, as your muscles adapt to the resistance and get stronger, that weight is no longer a challenge, and you have to add more weight to achieve the same results.

With weight training, theoretically you can continue to grow the size and strength of your muscles forever — as long as you continue to add weight.

Yoga is a more well-rounded approach

There are several reasons yoga is a more balanced way to do strength training:

  • A regular yoga practice can reduce your risk of injury and condition your body to perform better at things you have to do every day: walk, sit, twist, bend, lift groceries …. A form of functional fitness, yoga moves your body in the ways it was designed to move to help ensure that it keeps functioning properly. For example, in yoga you use both large and small muscles and move in many directions (twisting, arcing, etc.), not just back and forth on a one-dimensional plane, as in the forward-back motion of a bicep curl.

  • Yoga tones muscles all over your body, in balance with each other. Weight training exercises typically isolate and flex one muscle or muscle group at a time.

Rodney Yee Triangle Pose
  • Yoga relies on eccentric contraction, where the muscle stretches as it contracts, giving the muscles that sleek, elongated look while increasing flexibility in the muscles and joints. Weight training relies on the opposite physical principle of concentric muscle contraction, which means the muscle gets smaller as it contracts. Without proper stretching, the muscle fibers heal close together, giving the muscle that compact, bulging look.
  • Yoga increases muscle endurance because you typically hold any given pose for a period of time and repeat it several times during a yoga workout.

For good general fitness, do some of both

I advise clients who are just trying to stay fit and healthy (not do body-building) to get a mix of both body-weight exercises and workouts using weights or resistance tools. Many studies have shown that the more variety in your workout routine, the faster you’ll see results.

Note that body-weight exercises also include good-ol’ pushups, squats and other calisthenics — any type of movement that requires you to hold or lift yourself up with your limbs.

While the most important thing is to find a form of exercise you love and can see yourself doing as a lifelong habit, I encourage my clients to continually try new and different forms of exercise. If you include many types of workout techniques, you’ll continue to test and push your body in different ways, and you’ll keep growing as a fitness enthusiast and as an individual.

Which yoga poses are best for developing strength?

Rodney Yee Yoga Pose

Yee explains that certain types of yoga poses build muscle tone in different ways.

“Challenging arm balances and inversion poses are very effective for building muscle strength,” he says, “because they flex groups of smaller muscles — not just the major muscles you work with a weight machine — to support the body’s weight during the pose.”

“Holding standing poses such as the warrior poses and triangle pose,” he adds, “is great for strengthening the leg muscles. And in balance poses such as tree pose, one leg has to hold up your entire body. So you’re increasing your strength just by putting your weight on that leg.”

By holding the positions longer, doing more repetitions, and learning new yoga poses, you can make your yoga practice more or less challenging, just as you can with traditional body weight exercises like squats and lunges. Just don’t try to go straight to the advanced yoga videos and poses like arm balances to get on a fast-track to “cut” arms. Start with basic yoga poses at a class or using a yoga DVD. All of Gaiam’s yoga videos are now streaming at GaiamTV.com.

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About mountainsisters

WELCOME TO OUR BLOG WHERE WOMEN SHARE THEIR KNOWLEDGE AND CREATIVITY ON THE PATH TO ENLIGHTENMENT. We are two women sharing our thoughts, reflections and creativity. Stormy My name is Stormy and I have spent the last 20 years working on my spiritual growth and enlightenment. I still have a long way to go, but with your help I know I’ll keep growing, learning and expanding. Shar My name is Shar and I am a meditation, yoga and Qigong practitioner. I love to cook. I am vegan. I love to walk in nature, sing, drum, play guitar, write and spend time with family and friends.

3 responses to “CAN YOGA REPLACE STRENGTH TRAINING?”

  1. meredith says :

    I’ve mixed strength training/cardio workouts with yoga practices for many years. I know that reps may seem contrary to vinyasas, but I found that the addition fires the neurons in a way that yoga doesn’t, and my coordination improved, increasing both my strength and flexibility.

    • mountainsisters says :

      Thank you for your input, Meredith. My experience tells me that in order to get the strength/flexibility benefits from yoga alone, one must do yoga on a daily basis and hold poses for long periods of time. A complete workout would take around 2 hrs. or more. It’s a commitment that requires TIME!

      • meredith says :

        Wow. Well no wonder! I don’t have two hours every day, I’m afraid. One hour, yes. More than that… once in a while. I’m so glad you wrote the article.

        Thanks for your reply.

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